Temple of Diana

The Temple of Diana, built in the 1760’s for Sir Henry Bridgeman, is located within 1,000 acres of ‘Capability’ Brown Parkland on the Weston Park estate and has been refurbished to the highest of standards by an internationally renowned interior designer.

The Orangery and the ‘Tea Room’ have been transformed into wonderful spaces to relax, unwind, take breakfast looking out over Capability Brown’s Parkland and enjoy a short break in this truly special property.

Downstairs in the former dairies there is a high specification bespoke handmade kitchen, luxurious bathroom and comfy snug to relax in.

The Temple will sleep 6 in three double bedrooms, set over three floors with two being en-suite.

Background

The Temple of Diana, built in the 1760’s for Sir Henry Bridgeman, is located within 1,000 acres of ‘Capability’ Brown Parkland on the Weston Park estate.

The Temple is a masterpiece of the 18th century architect James Paine whose work can also be seen at Chatsworth and Alnwick Castle to name a few. Sir Henry Bridgeman inherited Weston in 1764, as grandson of Lady Anne Newport, sister of the 4th Earl of Bradford of the 1st creation. He started spending heavily on improvements to the House and wider estate. He ordered fine furniture in London, commissioned the stunning Gobelin tapestries from Paris and instructed the legendary ‘Capability’ Brown to landscape the park. It was Sir Henry’s vision that was to leave a lasting impression on the landscape at Weston.

As a multi-purpose 18th century garden building, the Temple has many intriguing features which will be enjoyed by guests 21st century style; a three-bay glazed Orangery used for the cultivation of exotic plants with a spectacular outlook over the landscape; the circular Tea Room ,where the lady of the house would take tea and the Octagonal Music Room where the family would gather for recitals.

The Temple was undoubtedly integral to Brown’s plans, nestled in Temple Wood, one of only five Pleasure Grounds conceived by Brown. The Temple’s north side was intended to be seen from across Temple Pool and was inspired by Andrea Palladio’s 16th century Venetian works and therefore gave the front and back of the building two very different architectural styles depending on how the visitor approached the estate.

The Weston Park Foundation, the independent charitable trust that now owns and maintains the estate has given this very special property a new lease of life, balancing comfort and modernity whilst respecting its heritage.

A short break in the Temple is a truly unique experience.

To book your stay at the Temple Diana please visit Rural Retreats